Skip to main content

About your Search

20121201
20121231
SHOW
Book TV 89
Journal 36
Cavuto 23
( more )
STATION
CSPAN2 174
FBC 170
CNBC 156
CSPAN 137
CNNW 112
FOXNEWSW 108
KQED (PBS) 84
SFGTV2 69
MSNBCW 68
KCSMMHZ 45
KRCB (PBS) 42
SFGTV 39
KCSM (PBS) 38
KQEH (PBS) 38
KTVU (FOX) 33
FOXNEWS 25
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 1559
Search Results 50 to 99 of about 1,598 (some duplicates have been removed)
government. do not and do what was done by us. do not criticize europe or try to get out of europe. play an active role in it. all of the points he was making almost directed at soviet gross tony who has said he will run for prime minister and has criticized the work of mario monti in the last few months. mario monti was talking about silvio berlusconi's ideas. it would be wonderful if the things could be scrapped. he has come out with popular statements that we will scrap what monti has done. monti has said it is not possible because italy needs the money. he is laying out an agenda. he was still doing it and will live. they are things he hopes will take place next february. we do not know what party will play in the government. he has not announced who will run as. mr.. will he play any part in the next government? will he allow them to use his name? we do not know yet. we will listen. >> the vote is over but not the controversy. the muslim brotherhood says the people who voted in favor of the new constitution. official results will not be known until a released monday. the draft const
>> just a few days until christmas, and europe, as elsewhere in the world, it is a time for peaceful contemplation with family or close friends. a very warm welcome to this special edition of "european journal" from belgium. christmas is a few days for rest where we find time for leisure, which has almost become a luxury good, but we will try to find it in today's show. that's why we have come to the flemish part of belgium. it is all-bishops town famous for tower bells, and when the time, it is a good opportunity to pause for a moment. >> the music of bells. the master coaxes melodia sounds from the musical instrument. high above the roofs of the town. >> for me, bell music is the connection between everyday life and spiritual life. it does not have to be religious, but there is definitely something spiritual about playing here. >> even as a child, he loved the sound of bells. the musician says it makes him dream, and for more than 30 years, he has been living that dream. >> it is a very social and communicated instrument. all the people in the town can hear it, and the
in seven months. although shanghai again trades lower even europe's pmi improves a touch in november. first up, we're one month away from the fiscal cliff and so far the white house and congressional republicans are still in disagreement over how to reduce the deficit and avoid a raft of tax hikes and spending cuts. yesterday our own jim cramer and maria bartiromo were on "meet the press" and cramer had a message for fellow panelists and father of the anti-tax pledge, grover norquist. >> most ceos are republican. they're on board. they're not on board with you. they're not on board with you because they fear your view. they think you do not favor going -- you favor going over the cliff. that's what they think. they think that you favor -- >> just for the record since we're on tv. that's silly if they think that they shouldn't be ceos. >> it doesn't really matter. that's what they think. >> i want you to walk me up to that moment. >> behind the record. i like that too. >> i'm stuck. like grover is stuck with this pledge he made everybody take which is that they have to go over the cliff beca
's what is scary. the backdrop of the presidential year was europe. we know where this path leads. all this turmoil, the huge welfare and the low productivity and high unemployment that comes along with them, that was the backdrop of the presidential campaign. voters voted, and they said, yes, we are going to keep moving in that direction, kim. where do you think the electorat is here? is it be ibd hue the choices that -- is it behind the choices that jason suggested they might be? >> barack obamaus won this election by very effectively making this a referendum about his opponent, mitt romney. if you went out and asked most americans, do you think barack obama did a great job in his first term? do you want significantly higher taxes? do you want the government to do nothing about spending? are you happy with obama care? most would say no. but in the end the choice was between a president who said things aren't great, but i'm going to still try to make them better, and a guy who he painted as not having a plan and not identifying with the average wants and needs of most middle class ame
let between innovators coming from central europe and those coming from the plateau which has fostered a suspicious negotiation and character they can see right of into the politics in bucharest to this day and i can go to every country, not every but many countries and talk about but. >> talk for a moment about germany. one of the images germany has natural boundaries to the north and south with the alps and further burden the east and the west is flat plains, so germany had a war over the century with germany or france or that area and poland and because germany was a continental power sandwiched between the maritime europe on one hand and the heartland towards the other it was always problematic which we it would go and how it would develop. i can across this book by accident in early 1989. the berlin fall with -- berlin wall would fall but november. it had occurred to me after reading this book and other books that the berlin wall or the dividing line between eastern and western germany was one. creation of german history that would reinvested soften different territory always in t
turn away from democracy as eastern europe did 50 years ago? i talked to pulitzer prize winning historian anne happalbaum. >>> the administration had a choice save chrysler by injecting taxpayer dollars or let it fail and let it lose perhaps a million jobs. car czar steve ratner gives us a fascinating inside look. for viewers in the united states, we have a special tonight at 8:00 and 11:00 p.m. eastern and pacific called "tough decisions." >>> but, first, here's my take. announcing that he would send proposals on reducing gun violence in america to congress, president obama this week mentioned a number of sensible gun control measures. but he also paid homage to the conventional washington wisdom from mental health issues to school safety. his spokesman jay carney said earlier this is a complex problem that will require complex solution. gun control carney from the only answer. let me respectfully disagree. the problem is not complex and the solution is blindingly obvious. there are three sets of causes that people point to when talking about events like the one in newtown. fir
politics and compromise. everyone knew about the growth. just like in europe. means it could be, in fact, reduced dramatically. fewer jobs, larger deficit. not smaller. and the federal reserve that's throwing up its hands, can't do anything. as i said last night, it doesn't matter. we can pick our stocks and buy them down. like the fabulous names, amazon, ulta salons. buy them down in scales like i outline in the book "real money." now suggesting other groups giving you a bang for the buck. new groups betting that the hope will be squeezed out and the bottom gets put in before a deal is made -- or not. why not? we know the auto market is for 11 years now and we have been sweet on ford domestically. before sandy. where are we internationally? europe. what are some of the other key area, though? i think latin america, though. i think it's coming back. asia already turned. here's the new piece of data. i think europe could be stablized. ford is the one to watch. you get that thing at 11 or blow. i'm out blessing it. haven't done that in a while. in europe i'm thinking that i'm sanguine. exc
the systems of canada and other parts of europe like having a single-payer take care of all medical expenses? 's been a good question. we could probably be here quite some time to answer. from our vantage point, what we see if this is somehow works in canada and it does not have the care level here in the united states. even in the european countries like the u.k., they too have a one payer system. what happens it is cause long lines and health care is delayed in getting to people in the result is a dear. it is a more simpler model under one roof or an ape in a society that can access care at a single point and village across the platform as a whole. we were governmental sponsored plan because it does not encourage innovation and does not encourage competitive aspects. we hope you will get better going forward. >> slightly off-topic, [laughter] >> mr. brousard, i want to comment and give you some background first. i am a humana -- prescriber through my wife's retirement. and generally very satisfied with the program, particularly enjoy the silver sneakers relationship to encourage exercise.
for the economy. and the transaction tax is being taken very seriously in europe and probably will happen there, even though the u.k. is kicking and screaming because they specialize in being the home of trading, whether trading in stocks or derivatives or anything else. they simply do not want that to be taxed. there are people in congress. i think wall street is now the number-one contributor to political campaigns. at least, it is in the running for number-one. i have been to washington many times and i'm involved with several groups that are trying to reform the business sector so that it can work, so that it can survive. it is very difficult because of the sheer amount of money that the finance sector in particular is pouring into lobbying and campaign contributions. it is very difficult. >> let's give a round of applause for lin. -- lynn. [applause] there is an opportunity for you to purchase and have the but signed. if you have court-further questions, she will be here signing books. thank you all and have a safe trip home. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [caption
that they're seeing in europe enough to keep them above the pencil line. >> what we've seen so far with today's numbers is exports are declining very sharp. they'll need asia and the u.s. to offset some of that demand weakness, but again, the biggest market for most is the euro zone. if the eurozone is performing badly, that will have a thok-on effect for those countries. >> there's a number of strategists saying after the u.s. has sort of led equities for most of the year, they're now saying europe is the place to be. from i think really the question you have to ask yourself is when cash, equities, credit, government bonds, where do you want to be. and equity in my mind mind is absolutely not. you need good growth numbers to justify the equity markets going up. now, i think there's a lot of investors looking at the yields on ghoechlt bonds or credits and that's motivating them to move into equity. i think the numbers are actually going to be relatively small. and i would certainly advocate against doing that because as you were saying, weak numbers, unless you see some much strong
previously thought, although the session still looks very much on course for another quarter here for europe. the pmi will rise above 50 that divides growth between contraction. hasn't stopped the euro/dollar from hitting a one and a half month high. i suppose we know growth is going to be anemic, but if spanish banks are getting some money, are we feeling slightly better? >> that's what euro trades on, isn't it? pmis are all very interesting for the economist. but they want bigger stories. most of the news flow, it's helpful to the euro. people have been trying to affect this rally for a while. we are close to those october highs. the news flow has been good, i would say. >> we hit, what, nearly 131.80? >> before that, we go 131.40. the enthusiasm for euro is surprisingly good. we're surprised by how far this rally has gone on pretty thin news sometimes. >> i just want to recap what we've got. eurozone finance ministers meeting in brussels. an agreement still seems pretty elusive at this moment. germany and french finance ministers have very different views about oversight of banks. and in
't accurate because of the things in europe or something involved with the election. in other words, other than those shorting or going long stocks ahead of the quarter, these earnings reports need a context to make you money. they can't be relied upon any more because they aren't as predictive of future behavior as they once were. they are a piece of the puzzle. a part of the mosaic. but they are only one of many important parts of what predicts where our stock will go over the intermediate term. and that tends to be the focus that i teach on the show. it is a teaching show because i want you to know the metrics i'm using to pick stocks i talk about and recommend here. and with my travel trust which you can follow along. i also want to teach you how to listen to these conference calls, listen to the transcripts. at least give economy opini-- g you my opinion and what i think matter. i hope this show once and for all -- because this is what i see on twitter constantly -- use earnings season as a way to evaluate your portfolio, what to trim, what you need more of. hone your way of thinking.
next month. tech stocks fall in europe after ericsson unveils a swedish crown writout related to its loss chip venture. >>> reports say the intercontinental call is in talks to buy euro next. >>> and vows to continue the current government's battle against japanese territorial claims. >>> japan's central bank has decided to extend its asset purchase program to $120 billion. it will review the bank's stance on price stability next month. abe has been putting pressure on the boj to raise its inflation target to 2% as part of efforts to fight deflation. for more on the fallout or the impact here, let's talk to luca from asia pacific. you look like you're in mourning here, but it sounds like the bank of japan has delivered pretty much what the market was looking for the. >> yes. it was delivered in order to be seen as losing independence after the campaign, very aggressive campaign from the ldp party on the bank of japan independence. actually, what -- the only policy they didn't really try, according to ldp, was being extremely aggressive, not as -- or much more aggressive than what the
. and so, they were desperate for the united states to open up the second front to western europe and the british. roosevelt's stalin to send molotov the top general to washington in may of 42 and in june of 40 to the united states issued a public statement saying we are going to open up the second front before the end of the war, before the end of the year 1942. we promise that publicly and get we don't open up the second front until june of 44 and that is partly because the british refused to go along with this. the united states and the british get involved in what marshall calls peripheral and marshall and eisenhower opened up a second front and the united states when instead to basically defend the british empire. there was going to be a lot of mistrust between the united states and the soviets particularly during the war. the seeds of the cold war actually are visible during the war. in certain tensions of course because the second front is the soviets had on their own and largely defeated the germans after stalingrstalingr ad and for pushing toward central europe and easter
. the intermediate nuclear forces treaty, or inf, led to the destruction of thousands of europe-based nuclear missiles on both sides. speakers here will include former assistant secretary of state richard burt, former u.s. ambassador to the soviet union, jack matlock, and will also there from former assistant secretary of state rozanne ridgway. the american foreign service association posted this hour and 20 minute event. >> i would like to wish all other good morning. one. i'm susan johnson, the president and i would like to extend a very warm welcome to you all. and thank you for coming to this important and special panel discussion. and also celebration of the 25th anniversary of the signing of the historic treaty. special thanks of course go to our panelists and our moderator, ambassadors matlock, ridgeway and bert, for sharing their experiences and reflections surrounded the complex negotiations that led to this treaty which was a significant factor in reducing dangers of the cold war. i'm sure you know all of these three imminent folks but i would just like to say a quick word. about th
. europe has also been a blend of red and green as the ft names ecb chief the person of the year. we're going to kick off with breaking news. for that would, we go to david faber. >> news on best buy, in the news yesterday. the stock up sharply. what we can tell you right now is the board of directors of best buy, and its founder, richard schultz, has been trying to put together a group to essentially buy the company in a go private transaction, have extended the deadline in which he would need to come with a bid for best buy and created a window in fact that will begin on february 1st next year and end with the end of that month on february the 28th. giving schultz the opportunity to look at not just christmas sales, but the end of their fiscal year, which will end at best buy on the 31st of january. and that window, again, will be 28 days long giving him an opportunity to continue to try to cobble together a bid with private equity firms and those who might finance a potential bid for the company at whatever price that might come at, if it were in fact to come at all. no word in te
been a resurgence of developed markets, europe particularly, and investors who left that market, that's been a great place to be for the last few months. there's so much focus on fiscal cliff. i think that's very hard to do on a day to day basis. for multiasset portfolios, the rest of the world is a good story right now. >> because we're so dominated by these issues in washington. rick santelli, some enthusiasm going on in these markets today with the anticipation of perhaps a deal. do you buy into it? is that what you're seeing in chicago? >> first of all, there are many expecting a deal. down in chicago, we don't just hope for a deal, we hope for a reform-oriented deal. to just do a deal without tagging it to reform is just going to make more of the same at some future date. the treasury complex really, really unfazed by just about all of it. briefly, we're under a 158 yield. haven't been there since second week in november. after 815, 118,000 jobs, interest rates were never as high as they were before that number. that really set part of the stage for treasuries. >> and you guys do
, more green than red on the board today. by three to two, gainers outpacing losers. now, europe was closed yesterday. there was trading in the u.s. it was a weaker session. that move did extend to some parts of asia overnight. interestingly enough, the shanghai composite down .6%. the hang seng was higher on the day. the nikkei adding .9%. the kospi was up even though south korea growth projections were lowered. european markets as we look across the major bourses give you a sense of the action we're seeing in the xetra dax which is about to have its best year in seven years, something like that. the ibex 35 is rallying as we get a further sense of how little value bon can i a has. the ftse mib is moving higher, too, adding about .1%. take a quick look at the bond space, the yield for spain and italy is moving higher today. but roughly as relevance we've seen predominating over the last couple of weeks. that is around 5.3% for spain. 4.5% for italy. we did see guilds moving about 3% level. now back below 1.9%. stick around because straight ahead, we get a view from one economist
in the overall market because of europe or something involved in the election. in other words, other than for those who are shorting or going long stocks ahead of the quarter, these earnings reports need a context to make you money. they can't be relied upon anymore because they aren't as predictive of future behavior as they once were. they are a piece of the puzzle. a part of the mosaic. but they are only one of many important parts that predicts where a stock will go over the interyacht term. that tends to be the focus that i teach on the show. and it is a teaching show. because i want you to know the metrics i'm using to pick stocks i talk about and recommend here. and pick for my charitable trust, actionalertsplus.com. i want to teach how you to listen to these calls and read the transcripts. i'm hoping this show will once and for all, because this is what i see at jim cramer on twitter constantly tell you how to evaluate your portfolio, figure out what you need to trim, what you need more of. let it help your stock selection hone your wave thinking. not mine. yours. earnings season
in europe, that still, you know, is simmering beneath the surface. >> rose: we conclude this evening with matt damon and john krakinski, two of the actors in gus van sant's new movie, "promised land". >> the biggest conversation matt and i can have is it starts conversation, beyond the issue of grabbing in the vernacular right now, to us it is the decision of communities gathering together and realizing that they have a voice and a responsibility to sort of unite and engage in these issues that are happening each day and deciding for themselves whether they want it. >> i forgot what it was like to start from, you know, the open laptop and that was just really fun, i just, my wife said to me in the middle of the whole thing, she says no matter what happens if you never make this movie, i haven't seen you this happy, at least remember how much fun it is to write. >> rose: a look at the economy and a look at the movies when we continue. funding for charlie rose was provided by the captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie
and india where there's a big social agenda, you have a different form. anyone europe, southern europe, northern europe, different forms, but in northern europe, the informed capitalism, where the government believes in strong social safety net, believes in paying for health care, believes in playing a role in determining what businesses grow or fail, and they're creating more jobs than we are. so we have to be careful when we, as we sometimes do in the united states, get up on our high horse and say we understand capitalism. actually what's going on in the world is a competition between different versions, and if our version produces more inequality, produces less growth, it's -- is seen as less fair and others are seep as more fair and producing growth, who do you think is going to win that arguement? >> host: a lot of people say the northern european countries, norway, sweden, et cetera, is socialists. is socialism a term that is outdated? >> guest: i think it is. let's take an example. car companies going bankrupt during the last cycle. america, big capitalist country, doesn't have
? >> i think, i just got back from two weeks in europe speaking to portfolio managers in seven different countries. they are profoundly underinvestmented in the u.s. the endowment funds in this country are profoundly underinvested in u.s. equities. a lot of portfolio managers are hoping equities go down as measured by the s&p so their underperformance doesn't look as bad. if the market doesn't go down here i think they will be forced to chase not end of the year. >> susie: uh-huh. beyond stocks, give us your thoughts on bonds, on gold, and other commodities. >> i think gold is in a secular bull market. i think it's just been consolidating the big run it has had and will eventually go higher. bons i think with the re-election of president obama it pretty much insurances you will have low-interest rates for the next 18 to 24 months at least on the shored end of the yield curve. but i think bonds you need to have a very specific idea in terms of investing the fixed income side of your asset allocation because i don't know how much below 0 interest rates can go. and if the economy starts to
to slow down and they likely will because europe their biggest customer goes into a full-blown recession if not worse, that is going to spell trouble for the global economy, people won't be needing energy and just like we saw in 2008 with the financial crisis, oil gets hit, the prices get hit in that environment, like you said, though, it i a coter cyclical so it is stimulative to the economy, more money in consumers products hopefully to buy and sustain the economy. >> complicated equation there, john, thanks a lot for coming and explaining all of this, have a great weekend. >> >> still hot on this friday night, u.s. manufacturing staying afloat, the luxury boat business made right here in the usa. >> it is called pay as you earn, it is a new obama administration program to pay off student loans, the starting date to sign up is next friday. but it looks like the plan favors graduate students who get bigger paychecks than low earning workers. >> in the state of >> reporter: in his state of the union address almost a year ago, the president announced a change to the way some people pay ba
reflect a positive outlook. some encouraging news on europe's economic crisis: standard and poor's gave greece a better grade. it got upgraded to a "b-minus" from "selective default" thanks to reassurances that greece will stay in the eurozone. on wall street, the dow rose 115 points, the nasdaq gained almost 44, and the s&p added 16. our next guest says any reasonable fiscal cliff deal is better than no deal. he's robert doll, chief equity strategist and senior portfolio manager at nuveen asset management. >> susie: hi, bob. nice to see you again. >> thanks, susie. >> susie: so investors and traders really do seem to think that a deal is coming, like our previous guest, roger altman. is this rally all about hopes for a deal or something nore fundamental? >> it is about hope for a deal. the malaise and the lack of confidence and the uncertainty has been pervasive, as you well know, susie. that has held corporations back from doing things, from spending money, and some individuals as well. as roger said a few minutes ago, if we can clear the air with some sort of fiscal cliff deal, i thi
you very much. a key session in japan overnight. >>> as we pivot our focus to europe, you see stocks addi adding .3%. consistent with the rally we've seen over the last several trading sessions and apparently having plenty to do with the possible resolution of u.s. fiscal talks. we'll have more in a little bit. the survey also helping to lift sentiment or keep it buoyant. look at the major borses. green in the harder hit regions. ftse mib, spain up better than 1%. consistent with the rally we saw yesterday. remarkable. the xetra dax adding .1%. for its part, up to close to 30% this year. the ftse 100 adding .3. the bond space, we'll look at that and talk later about the big trades that have helped some hedge funds, for example, when it comes to greek debt. for the time being, mario's comments this summer is have techively kept the bond gleelds a tight range since then six months or so now, this is going. and differentiation across the space where italy price rising, not the case for spain which is seeing its yield up to 5.3. and i know we haven't mentioned this in a while, but i want
is that with 18 months of kosciuszko's death this will was contested by three different parties, in europe, one within the united states at the time, when that surface three different subsequent wills that had been drawn up in europe, and so i don't quite understand, and in jefferson -- at this point he said this is going to really fall into a lot of litigation. he said i think it's going to go past my lifetime. he was right. and so he resigned as executor, and sure enough, this litigation continued. finally, wound up in supreme court. it was resolved in 1852 in favor of the polish descendents your this is 26 years after jefferson's death. so what i'm confused about is how did he ever have that money in front of him? the money was in the u.s. treasury in washington, and he never had access to it. and after that date it was tied up in the courts. so how could he have used this money to free slaves? and how did he have that option of no, i'm going to back off of this, i don't want to free my slaves. i'm really confused as to how he ever had access to those funds. >> the will end up in litigation
all over the struggling countries of eastern europe with promises of badly- needed work abroad. many are unaware of what the traffickers have in store. the production team has set up cameras here. >> we knew that if we wanted to get inside the story that we had to be in a place where it was so prevalent that everybody would have an example or know people who were trafficked. and that's what brought us ultimately to odessa. >> narrator: frustrated with an inability to chase the traffickers overseas, the ukrainian secret service has given us a tip about a suspected sex trader who regularly brings girls through here. across from the port, on the famous odessa steps, we secretly film as she traffics young women to turkey. we've been asked to call her olga. >> the secret service said that she runs a legitimate business as a cover, and she basically takes women from moldova and ukraine to work as domestics in turkey. and amongst these women are some younger women who she sells to traffickers and pimps in turkey. we wanted to answer some fundamental questions, like why don't these women run
in yesterday's rally. we didn't get housing starts, that's earlier today. as for the picture in europe, really the stand outout here is the euro. greece getting a five notch upgrade at the s&p. our road map this morning starts with gm. government motors no more. the treasury to exit its stake in the next 12 to 18 months, purchasing 2 million shares by the end of this month. >> another challenging quarter for fedex with the blame squarely on sandy. but the stock is up pre-market. >> oracle posts a strong quarter with even stronger guidance. the season rebound in europe. no impact from the fiscal cliff. >> and ge gets boosted from ubs's key call list on the weaker than expected macro environment. still on the list is including -- well tell you in a couple of minutes. >> general motors is up sharply in the pre-market session. the treasury department says it intends to sell the rest of its stakes in gm in the next 12 to 15 months. the automaker will buy back 200 million shares from treasury for $27.50 a share. treasury says it plans to sell its other remaining shares through various means in an or
movement in europe. capitalism has always been recycling. the process of described is a process whereby the entrepreneur is now forced to be an entrepreneur. the ex-peasants, they did not choose to be entrepreneurs. they had to be. they used debt. bringing it to the present, energizing the production process, producing the wealth from which he hopes that he will be able to repay the debt. the moneylenders, later the bankers. cover for the fact that he had paid wages for capital goods. hoping there is something left for him, for profit. debt is all about intertemporal recycling. by effectively taking his hand and pushing it into the future, grabbing value that had not been generated. -- that is debt. producing the wealth, from which they hoped they would pay the debt. moneylenders, bankers. covering the fact that he had already paid wages, hoping that there would be something less for -- left for him. the fact that there is recycling -- you take a value for the future, bring it into the present, so as to develop -- delivered the body to the future. the problem with this process is once y
reached out to us because he couldn't get anyone else. central europe last year, budapest, the czech republic had gone from a leading country in central europe, leading the region in laws and in the constitution of equality 16 years ago to a complete reversal today. it's got one of the worst records today of the deprivation of rights of women, roma people, jews, and lgbt people. sound familiar, that grouping? i was not prepared for what i was going to find in budapest. i was not prepared for the thousands ofneo nazis and state sanctioned militia that would meet a couple hundred marchers, thousands of them. * there was one young man, 21 years old, young hungarian, who would be the only person to go on tv with me, only hungarian, malan would take a blow horn and walk through the streets against families that hated us, and he walked and he shouted and he kept the morale up as we were walking against this sea of people who didn't like us because we were representing the inclusion and diversity that we so much cherish here. he was inspired by the story of my uncle and he said to me, do yo
. the number of people planning to visit europe rose nearly 14%. the number of domestic travelers also increased by 1.3%. trips to the tokyo area are expected to rise nearly 2%. the capital's new landmark, tokyo's sky tree tower and the renovated tokyo station are expected to be tourist spots. >>> judges on the tokyo district court ruled the government must pay compensation for worker who is suffer health problems due to exposure to asbestos. the plaintiffs claim the workers inhaled asbestos at building sites causing them to develop lung cancer and other illnesses. the presiding judge said the government didn't do enough to protect workers for the risks posed by asbestos. he said it should have ordered contractors to ensure workers more dusk masks and impose a penalty for violations. the court ordered the government to pay $13 million in damages to 170 former workers for their bereaved families. in all more than 600 plaintiffs across joop japan have filed lawsuits against the government, claiming damages for asbestos. the japanese government outlawed asbestos in principle in 1975, but
, mild, 24 degrees there in houston. now, let's look over towards europe. first i want to talk about this storm system here in eastern europe ar europe around the balkans. you saw 65 kilometer per hour winds today. this is due to the strong system moving off towards turkey, but still bringing with it gusty winds and heavy rains and even destructive winds possible at this time. don't be surprised if we see a report of a tornado out of this one. il it's just a very severe storm system. farther to the west into the british isles with clear skies. going into the afternoon we have another storm system off the atlantic. that's going to bring is all sorts windy and rainy conditions. really dampen down on here on wednesday into thursday as that system continues to push onshore. from the south warm air surges ahead of it. madrid there with a high of 13. london and paris at 7 and 8, not so much the case farther towards the east, though. moscow's high is minus 16 for your high on your wednesday. here's a look at your extended forecast. >>> we'll be back in 30 minutes with more news. i'm gene ot
for the second month in a row. although europe's biggest economy is experiencing a slowdown, this fresh optimism for the six months ahead. >> the closely watched fio -- ifo index climbed by one point this month. only wholesalers and retailers are not sharing the positive outlook. the index takes the pulse of 7000 companies across germany. for more now, we had to the franc fort -- frankfurt stock exchange. positive news on the german economy. has that brought some cheer on the floor there? >> this is indeed a very nice christmas present and a strong signal that the german economy will recover again after its winter sleep, but the dax did not make a huge step forward. the stronger than expected ifo index may prevent european central banks from lowering interest rates again. >> we have had developments also in a libor scandal that broke earlier this summer. tell us about that. >> yes, the news is very bad. ubs has to pay the record fine of 1.2 billion euros in this libor scandal and its manipulation of interest rates. some british banks also have to pay millions of euros, and also deutsche bank is
Search Results 50 to 99 of about 1,598 (some duplicates have been removed)